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Skinny jeans are definitely becoming a fashion statement in today’s generation. They can be worn with virtually anything and from what I hear they are extremely comfortable. But, based on a story out of Australia, I would recommend wearing them while you’re doing any kind of strenuous activity—stick with some sort of lose clothing for that. A 35-year old woman was helping her friend move and she was doing a lot of bending and squatting throughout the day. Your legs and feet naturally get more swollen than any other part of your body because of gravity and they are part of the body that’s furthest from the heart. With that said, the woman started getting more uncomfortable as the day progressed when she eventually had to go to the emergency room and have her pants cut off from her. The doctors said she developed a mild case of compartment syndrome by compressing her peroneal and tibial nerves.

Compartment syndrome is extremely rare. The leg and foot are divided into different compartments; the leg having 4 compartments and the foot having 9 (depending on what source you read). These compartments can become inflamed and fill with fluid and compress on nerves and vessels within the compartment causing lack of oxygen to any part further down from it and numbness and tingling in that leg or foot. The only feasible treatment for compartment syndrome is a fasciotomy. That involves relieving the pressure in that area by making an incision to release any fluid or swelling. Compartment syndrome is most commonly seen in the lower extremity so your local podiatrists at Affiliated Foot and Ankle Care of Monroe and Edison, NJ know exactly what it takes to treat and care for patients who have experienced this rare phenomenon.

Again, compartment syndrome is extremely rare but if you or someone you know have any symptoms of suddenly swollen legs/feet, numbness and tingling, and extreme pain please go to the emergency room as soon as possible. This syndrome can cause loss of limb if not treated in a timely manner.

By Varun Gujral

 

By Nrupa Shah
June 18, 2015
Category: Fractures

It seems the more and more I talk about how rare I think it is that performers injure themselves on stage, the more and more they are doing it. Recently, the lead singer of the Foo Fighters, David Grohl, fell off the stage and broke his leg. The extent of his injury, however is still being decided. With that said, though, taking a spill from a concert stage can cause real damage to your leg and often times “a broken leg” can also mean an injury to the ankle as well.

Traumatic ankle fractures often involve fractures of the lower leg as well. Depending on the way the foot is planted and the direction the leg turns will decide that fate but the most traumatic position the foot and leg can be in is a pronated foot with an externally rotated leg. However, the most common combination is a supinated foot with an externally rotated leg. In any event, treatment for these types of injuries usually involves surgical intervention. Main reason being is because with this type of injury, developing arthritis is already high, but if the fracture is not reduced the chances for arthritis is increased dramatically. These types of injuries are emergent but swelling of the leg and ankle is the deciding factor in these types of injuries. Swelling needs to subside before surgery can be considered due to the fact that if skin that is tense because of the swelling is cut into, it will filet open and will not be able to be closed back up. So, patients are usually told to ice and elevate their injured leg for about 7 days before they see the surgeon and undergo surgery. After surgery patients are usually non weight bearing for four-to-six weeks in a cast.

Whether it’s a fall from 3 feet or 10 feet, a broken leg is a broken leg and it needs to be fixed. If you have experienced a fall that resulted in what you think may be a broken leg/foot/ankle, please go to the ER as soon as possible! From everybody here at Affiliated Foot and Ankle Care located in Monroe and Edison, NJ we hope Mr. Grohl an uneventful recovery in hopes he can get back on stage.

By Nrupa Shah

 

By Varun Gujral
June 10, 2015
Category: Sports Injury

Catchers, no matter what level, are seemingly in the most uncomfortable position relative to any other in the sport. If you think about it, they are always squatting which puts a lot of pressure on the knees, ankles and the rest of the foot, and if a catcher plays for ‘x’ number of years all of those joints and/or bones will eventually breakdown. Unfortunately for New York Yankees catcher Brian McCann, he has apparently suffered the longstanding of being a catcher. McCann has been a catcher in the MLB for 10 years (the first eight of those years he served with the Atlanta Braves). So you can imagine, 10 years-worth of squatting can surely take a toll on someone. Another question someone might ask is, “Why doesn’t it happen to all catchers then?” The answer to that is, every catcher has a unique style of catching from where they put their feet to how they squat.

The traditional catching stance—knees out over toes, weight on the balls of the feet, and the backside practically resting on the heels—is probably the most damaging to the joints and bones of the lower leg. The reason this is such a damaging posture—from a podiatrist’s standpoint—is because there is a large amount of strain being put on the Achilles tendon. The Achilles tendon is the longest and strongest tendon in the human body but if put under stress and strain for years on end it will eventually lose its integrity which in turn can cause the rest of the foot to breakdown. Although it seems like it just attaches to the back of the heel bone, it actually continues onto the underside of the foot and becomes part of the plantar fascia. This is important to keep in mind because the plantar fascia is the foundation of the arch of the foot; once the plantar fascia fails, the rest of the foot will too. That’s not to say this is what happened to McCann, but I would venture a guess that it’s definitely related.

McCann will be getting an MRI to assess if there is any damage to the soft tissue (muscles, tendons, ligaments) and joints of his right foot. From everyone here at Affiliated Foot and Ankle Care in Monroe and Edison, NJ we wish him a quick recovery so he is able to get back behind the plate.

By Varun Gujral

By Nrupa Shah
June 04, 2015
Category: Fractures

I seem to blog a lot about professional performers. I don’t know if it’s because they are always in the news or if they interest me more than most. In any event, I want to talk this time about Florence Welch. Welch is the front woman of the group, Florence + The Machine, an Indie rock group from London, England. She recently performed her first U.K. show this year on May 25th. Little did people know, she would be sitting down for the entire gig. Why? A few weeks prior, at the Coachella Music Festival in California, Welch broke her foot; her third metatarsal to be exact. “I don’t want to stand in case I do any more damage, so I’ll just have to sit down” she said before her performance.

 The bone that she broke—her third metatarsal—is not a common bone to break. This is because it is in the middle of your foot and does not normally bear a lot of weight so there are not nearly as many forces going through it compared to your first and fifth metatarsals. With that said, the most common way this bone is broken is by torqueing or twisting, and by direct crushing of the bone. Although the cause of how Welch broke her foot is unknown, the treatment is usually the same for each. Treatment also depends on the severity of the break; does it involve a joint? Is it displaced? Are there a lot of bony pieces? Once the extent of the break is determined, treatment can be employed. Patients are typically kept non-weight bearing in a cast or CAM (Controlled Ankle Motion) walker if the break is simple, and doesn’t involve the joint. If the break is more extensive, surgical intervention may be warranted.

 Welch seems to know what she is doing seeing as how she chose to sit down for the entirety of her show. This is not the case most of the time. If you have any doubt or concern that you broke your foot, please don’t hesitate to call your local podiatrists at Affiliated Foot and Ankle Care in Monroe and Edison, NJ. We wish Ms. Welch a speedy recovery and hope she is able to take the stage like she’s used to doing!

 By Nrupa Shah

 

By Varun Gujral
May 21, 2015
Category: Amputation

Dancing with the Stars is one of the most popular television shows to date and it’s attracting contestants of all shapes and sizes. And the dances they do are surely not made for the faint-hearted—meaning, if you’re not in good shape these dances will get the best of you. Noah Galloway was not going to let what has happened to him hinder him from competing—and nearly winning—in the star-studded television show.

Noah Galloway is a double amputee. He is missing part of his left lower leg and left arm. You would think someone like him would not be able to dance with the sports’ finest. Well, he proved everyone wrong. Not only did he compete, he and his partner took 3rd place! That is absolutely astonishing to me! What makes it more interesting is, dancers usually approach their partner from the left side. But, since he has an amputated left arm (above the elbow), his partner, Sharna Burgess, had to “learn” to dance on his right side. So in all aspects of the competition they were at a disadvantage but they did not let that get between them. I’m not taking anything away from anyone who is an amputee whatsoever, but to see Galloway dance, twist, lift, bend, and whatever else he had to do, in my opinion, puts him on top of one of the greatest dancers I’ve ever seen.

Dancing in and of itself is an extremely tough sport. When you’re missing part of your leg and arm I would imagine the difficulty increases one thousand fold. That’s obviously a very subjective statement, but I’m fairly positive any amputee would agree. Noah Galloway was a Sergeant to the 1st Battalion of the 502nd Infantry, 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, during Operation Iraqi Freedom. From everyone at Affiliate Foot and Ankle Care in Monroe and Edison, NJ we want to thank you for your service and everything you have done for our country and congratulate on such a great performance in this season of Dancing with the Stars!

By Varun Gujral





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