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Posts for category: High Heels

By Varun Gujral
January 07, 2015
Category: High Heels

When you think of women wearing high heels you think of places like New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Miami—places where self-image is a major influence relative to one’s character. This, however, is not the case. A study conducted by Gilt, an online discount fashion store, concluded that the “highest of heels” are found in none other than, Puerto Rico. This survey is flawed, however, in that it only takes into account Gilt customers only but it still gives a pretty good idea of what consumers are looking for and where they are looking for it.

Puerto Rico topped the survey with an average heel height of 2.87 inches. The states with the lowest heel height were Nebraska, Kansas, Maine, and Vermont (between 1.80-1.97 inches).  The importance of this study isn’t to narrow down where to find the highest heeled shoes. It’s important because high heels are a definitive cause of lateral ankle instability and ankle sprains among women and this survey points out that consumers will go to extreme heights to look fashionable—in other words, fashion trumps health. I would venture to guess that podiatrists in the aforementioned states with the highest heel heights recorded are pretty busy when it comes to treating those conditions. The most practical height for a heel is approximately 1.50 inches and those heels are termed “kitten heels” although your local podiatrists at Affiliated Foot and Ankle Care located in Monroe and Edison, NJ wouldn’t condone any of our patients to wear high heels unless they needed to for their job. To reiterate, they put patients at higher risk for ankle problems and can even cause hammertoes and bunions due to increase force and pressure in those particular areas.

Now we’re not saying do not ever wear high heel shoes. We just want you to be aware of the potential problems associated with wearing them. By-all-means, if you must wear them, then do so appropriately. Try and wear a heel that is no higher than 2.00 inches to try and minimize the forces put on the front of the foot. There isn’t any real evidence on this topic and that is why I think it is interesting to talk about. Likewise, because high heels are such a popular element of fashion in today’s society I think there needs to be more research conducted in this area.

From everyone at Affiliated Foot and Ankle Care, we hope everyone has an excellent New Year and that it brings you all much success and happiness!

By Varun Gujral

By Nrupa Shah
November 05, 2014
Category: High Heels

Running a marathon is something a lot of people like to do just to check it off their bucket list. Then there are those who run (marathons) for a living. To run a marathon one must train very hard at least six months prior to the event--at the least! With that said, marathons are NOT easy tasks to accomplish. They are even harder to accomplish if you plan on running one in high heels! Thirty seven year old mother of five, Natalie Eckert is planning on completing the 2015 London Marathon doing just that. She was inspired by the German-native Julia Plecher who ran a 100m-dash in gold high heels in a record time of 14.351 seconds.

 Now, running a 100m dash and running a marathon are two completely different things. To put it in perspective, a marathon (26.2 miles) is 42,164.81 meters...that’s approximately 420-times the distance compared to the 100m dash. Running marathons are dangerous if one hasn’t trained properly, but even experienced runners who train yearly for these events can sustain the unwanted trauma that running a distance of this magnitude causes. Injuries frequently associated with marathon runners are, but not limited to: stress fractures (of the foot), meniscal tears (of the knee), and ligamentous injuries (i.e., ankle sprains). Your local podiatrists at Affiliated Foot and Ankle Care in Monroe and Edison, NJ see these injuries all the time during the New York and Boston Marathon months and they are experts when it comes to managing and treating these conditions.

 Wearing high heels puts a lot of pressure on the balls of the feet and greatly increases a person’s chance of a lateral ankle sprain. Knowing that, running 26.2 miles in heels is extremely dangerous and certainly advised against. It is one thing to want to make history but is it really worth the pain and agony she’ll be in after? I don’t think so. If she does go through with it though, I wish her the best and hope she has a speedy recovery.

 By Nrupa Shah