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Posts for: March, 2019

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
March 27, 2019
Category: Bunions

At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we want to dispel the notion that there’s nothing that can be done for a bunion short of surgery. Yes, it’s true that a surgical procedure is necessary to correct or eliminate a bunion, but our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral, and Dr. Nrupa Shah have many treatment methods that can decrease pain and slow the progression of your bunion, enabling you to continue to enjoy an active lifestyle. These include:

Protective Padding—one of the major sources of pain for bunion patients is friction from where the bunion rubs against the inside of the shoes. Padding made of felt, gel or other material can provide a protective cushion and reduce skin inflammation.

Corn and Callus Removal—over time, constant friction and pressure caused by the bunion can result in secondary problems like calluses and corns forming on the toe. These, in turn, increase pain and discomfort. Removing them can bring some relief.

Shoe Modifications—your shoes can be one of the biggest causes of bunion growth. Choose styles that have a wide toe box and low heels. Narrow, pointy shoes encourage the big toe to move out of place. The podiatrist may also prescribe a custom orthotic device to wear inside your shoes to help stabilize the joint and keep your foot stay in the correct position.

Night Splints—the foot doctor may recommend splints to wear while you sleep that will help your toes and joints align properly. These are particularly effective for adolescents whose bones are still developing.

Exercises—there are a number of exercises that are designed to maintain range of motion and joint flexibility which can be helpful in preventing stiffness in the toe or arthritis setting in.

Don’t wait until your bunion is so painful that you can no longer walk properly. Make an appointment at our Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction office as soon as possible by calling: 732-662-3050.


By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
March 20, 2019
Category: skin conditions
Tags: Diabetes   Athlete's Foot  

Xerosis may sound like a rare, tropical foot disease, but relax—it’s just a fancy medical term for extremely dry skin. At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care, we often find that the dry air of winter and the extra heating of our cars, offices, and homes can leave patients with skin on their feet that’s very dry and flaky. Below are some do’s and don’ts for helping with this problem:

Do: step up your moisturizing routine. Find a thick, rich emollient cream and apply it to your feet multiple times throughout the day if possible. Consider putting on at night and then slipping on a pair of thick socks to help the moisturizer absorb into your skin.

Don’t: take more than one bath or shower on a daily basis.

Do: choose soaps that are not overly drying to your skin. Look for kinds that contain moisturizers or oatmeal which soothes dry skin.

Don’t: use overly hot water when bathing or showering.

Do: use a laundry detergent that is fragrance-free and made for sensitive skin.

Do: contact our Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction office immediately if you are diabetic. Diabetes is associated with dysfunction of the sweat and oil glands in your feet, which can make dry skin worse and lead to cracks in the heels. This could provide an entry point for bacteria and cause a serious problem. It’s also a good idea to make an appointment even if you are not diabetic but have had the dry skin for over two weeks without improvement. Skin on your feet that is red, itchy, flaking or oozing could be a sign of athlete’s foot or another bacterial or viral infection. Our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah will want to examine your feet at that point and determine if there is a cause of your dry skin that requires treatment. Contact us by calling: 732-662-3050.


By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
March 12, 2019
Category: Sports Injuries

March is National Athletic Training Month, and at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we want our patients to be aware of the important resources these health care professionals offer. Athletic trainers are found on sports fields and in professional settings like the physical therapist’s office. They play an important role in helping diagnose injuries related to exercise and sports and finding ways to decrease pain and make exercise more comfortable.

Overuse Injury Management

Many sports injuries, such as shin splints, Achilles tendonitis, and stress fractures are the result of overuse. Dramatically increasing the duration or intensity of an activity in a short period is often the cause of these types of injuries. If you have symptoms such as pain, swelling, inflammation, and difficulty bearing weight on one or both feet, an athletic trainer can evaluate you and may recommend that you see the podiatrist.

Our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral, and Dr. Nrupa Shah may order imaging studies such as an x-ray, MRI or bone scan to get a complete picture of the condition of your foot, ankle or leg. The foot doctor will recommend the best treatment for you. The athletic trainer can help with recovery in a number of ways, including:

  • Modifying your training schedule to reduce stress to the affected area
  • Offer suggestions about the appropriate footwear for your activity
  • Help with flexibility and strength training for your lower extremity muscles
  • Discuss nutrition and ways to ensure you get enough calcium and vitamin D in your diet for strong bones
  • Devise cross-training programs that will help you maintain your fitness level while decreasing repetitive stress on your legs, feet, and ankles

Podiatrists and athletic trainers are partners in your podiatric health care. If you are experiencing pain or discomfort related to exercise or a sport, don’t delay. Contact our Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction office today by calling: 732-662-3050.


By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
March 05, 2019
Category: Nutrition

March is National Nutrition Month, and at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care, we think this is a great opportunity to inform patients about the important ways that food affects the health of your feet.

Weight Watching

Everyone knows that what and how much you eat determines what you weigh. What you may not realize is the importance of maintaining a healthy weight for your feet. Since your feet carry the weight of your entire body, if you are overweight, you are putting excess strain on your feet. Weighing more than you should can be a risk factor for several foot conditions, including flat feet, plantar fasciitis, metatarsalgia, and sesamoiditis, to name a few. Being overweight increases your chances for systemic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease which can also have a negative impact on the health of your lower extremities.

Inflammation Fighters

Many podiatric conditions have inflammation as a primary symptom. Arthritis, Achilles tendonitis, and plantar fasciitis are examples of painful podiatric disorders brought about by inflammation. Studies have found that certain foods can trigger an inflammatory response in the body. Some of these include fried foods and foods high in sugar. Other foods, like berries, fish high Omega 3 fatty acids, and olive oil, can help suppress or reduce inflammation.

Gout Triggers

Certain foods can bring on a gout attack. Gout is a form of arthritis that most often strikes the big toe joint and is caused by too much uric acid in your body which crystallizes in the joint and results in severe pain. Foods to avoid include red meat, organ meats, beer, brandy, red wine, and shellfish.

The next time you are in for an appointment at our Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction office, ask our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah if you could improve a foot condition you have with modifications to your diet. You can contact us by calling: 732-662-3050.