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By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
March 28, 2018
Tags: stress fracture   bunion  

Before March is history, we at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care want to recognize Women’s History Month by offering some important podiatric health care information about conditions that particularly affect women.

  1. Bunions—this deformity is caused by a biomechanical problem that encourages the big toe to move out of place at the base joint and drift toward the second toe. Why, then, is this more of an issue for men than women? While both sexes may have the faulty foot structure (which is often inherited), women are far more likely to have the condition progress to the point where the telltale bump forms on the side of the foot causing pain and making it difficult to wear shoes. This is due largely to shoe choice. High heels and narrow, pointy toes forcibly squeeze the toes together and put pressure on the big toe, aiding in its dislocation. There are, however, both conservative and surgical measures that can help slow the progression or correct a bunion.
  2. Stress fractures—these tiny cracks in the surface of a foot bone, most often on the top of the forefoot, are frequently the way that a woman learns that she has osteoporosis. This condition will ultimately affect 1 in 2 women over the age of 50. Adequate amounts of calcium, as well as weight-bearing exercise done regularly, can help prevent this order. It’s important to realize that symptoms of a stress fracture may be intermittent and not appear very serious at first. Pain and swelling that cannot be explained by an injury require an evaluation by the foot doctor.
  3. Morton’s neuroma—this disorder is particularly prevalent among runners. Pain, tingling, and burning sensations in the ball of the foot or the feeling that there is a pebble in your shoe all the time are signs of this nerve irritation. What gives women runners a greater likelihood than men for developing this condition is that in addition to the repetitive stress on the ball of the foot from running, wearing platform or high heeled shoes also applies pressure to the same part of the foot.

In all of the above situations, there are measures that can be taken both proactively and in the early stages of the disorder that can greatly decrease the chance of disability or surgery. Let our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah examine your feet and diagnose your pain sooner rather than later. Contact our New Jersey offices in Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction at 732-662-3050.

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