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By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
April 13, 2017
Category: Proper Foot Care
Tags: Untagged

Most of the time, patients come to Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care to find out what foot problem is plaguing them but sometimes what they learn instead is that they have a systemic disease that affects their entire body. Symptoms that are affecting your feet can be a tip off to a bigger medical problem. Here are some illnesses that reveal themselves in your feet:

  1. Thyroid Disorder—if this gland is overactive (hyperthyroidism) it can cause muscle weakness, nervousness and problems with skin and hair. An underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) can result in fatigue, depression and feeling cold. In either case, signs of thyroid disorders can be found in nail and skin changes. Feet that are excessively sweaty or so dry that they become cracked can point to a problem with the thyroid.
  2. Diabetes—one of the side effects of diabetes is neuropathy or nerve damage. Nerve damage in the feet can be experienced as burning, tingling, numbness or a “pins and needles” type of discomfort. Swelling can also be a sign of a circulation issue, another problem typically associated with diabetes.
  3. Cardiovascular Disease—indications of circulatory problems such as swelling of ankles and feet can also be an indicator of high blood pressure or other cardiovascular disorders.
  4. Osteoporosis and calcium deficiencies—with nearly a quarter of the bones in your body found in your feet it’s not surprising that issues such as osteoporosis or a calcium deficiency would be apparent there. Stress fractures and regular fractures can be signs of these disorders.

If you notice unusual changes in your feet or ankles—including changes in your toenails, skin color, swelling, bruising or shape changes—contact our Edison, Monmouth Junction or Monroe office by calling 732-662-3050 and let our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral or Dr. Nrupa Shah perform a complete examination. What your foot doctor finds may significantly impact your health. 

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