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By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
January 16, 2019
Category: Diabetic Foot Care

Are you one of 29 million Americans that have diabetes? If so, all of us at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care want you to know that you have significant power in controlling this disease and how it affects your feet. Diabetes deals your feet a double blow: first, it can cause neuropathy or nerve damage to the feet which makes it difficult to detect cuts or injuries to the feet. Second, diabetes can impede circulation which restricts the flow of oxygen-rich blood that can speed healing to the extremities.

There are steps you can take, however, to help protect your feet if you have diabetes:

  • Keep your sugar levels under control. Following all your doctor’s instructions for managing your diabetes will lower your risk for complications significantly.
  • Get in the habit of doing self-exams. Check your feet daily for cuts, open sores, blisters, swelling, bruising, changes in skin color or nail condition. Report anything unusual to our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah so that they can examine your feet and adjust your treatment accordingly.
  • Choose shoes wisely. Get your foot professionally measured and choose shoes that have a roomy toe box and are made out of soft, flexible materials. Look over your feet for red marks, blisters or other signs of friction from your footwear.
  • Keep feet dry. Wear socks made of moisture-wicking materials that help feet stay dry. Change socks as soon as your feet feel damp. If you tend to sweat profusely, use an anti-fungal foot powder before putting on socks.
  • Avoid going barefoot. Even at home, bare feet are more likely to sustain a puncture wound or cut from stepping on a sharp object. Your risk for athlete’s foot or fungal infections decreases if you keep your feet covered when walking in public places.
  • Don’t practice “bathroom surgery.” Attempting to remove warts, corns or calluses or dig out ingrown toenails is likely to result in injury and infection which could pose a significant medical threat.
  • Schedule regular podiatric checkups. Your foot doctor is your partner in managing your diabetes. If you have questions about your feet and diabetes, contact our New Jersey locations in Edison, Monroe, Linden or Monmouth Junction by calling: 732-662-3050.

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