732-662-3050

 




 
 

 

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
December 29, 2016
Tags: Gout  

Chances are if you’ve had an attack of gout it was memorable. Extreme, throbbing pain in a very swollen big toe which often comes on in the middle of the night and lasts for several hours before subsiding is typical. Also known as gouty arthritis, this condition occurs as a result of an excessive amount of the salts or uric acid (known as purines) building up and crystallizing in the joints. At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we want our patients to know more about this condition and how to prevent it.

Why Here, Why Now?

Although gout can strike any joint, the big toe is the most common site of this affliction. Two reasons for this being: uric acid is sensitive to temperature and is more likely to crystallize when it’s cold. Not only is it winter, but your big toe is the part of your body farthest from the heart and therefore it’s the coldest. The other significant factor is that your big toe joint is exposed to an extreme amount of pressure when you walk. Your diet can also play a key role in triggering gout. Red meat, shellfish, rich sauces, brandy, beer and wine have all been linked to gout attacks and these types of food are served in abundance during the holiday season.

What Can Be Done?

Once you’ve had gout, it’s likely to reoccur in the same toe. One of our board certified foot and ankle surgeons, Dr. Varun Gujral or Dr. Nrupa Shah will want to examine your toe and also get a complete medical history. Most likely the foot doctor will ask questions about your recent activities and diet. During a gout attack, icing the big toe or applying a cooling lotion may help reduce the pain and swelling. On an ongoing basis, the podiatrist may prescribe medication and suggest dietary modifications to help prevent future attacks. Sometimes the foot doctor may recommend shoes that are specially made to help minimize gout-related pain.

If you have additional questions about the painful condition of gout, please contact our Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction office.

Comments: