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Posts for tag: Haglund's Deformity

Winter brings many opportunities for outdoor fun and sports you can only do in snow and ice like skating, sledding, skiing, and snowboarding. At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care, we want our patients to enjoy these activities but know that there are also risks that come along with them. Common podiatric injuries related to winter sports are sprains, fractures, and dislocations. Fortunately, you can prevent many winter sports injuries. Below are some tips for keeping your feet and ankles safe while enjoying cold-weather fun.

  • Know your sport. Improper technique can lead to injuries. If you are new to a skiing, snowboarding, skating or another winter sport, consider taking a lesson from a qualified instructor. Professionals can teach you basics about a sport, including something as important as how to fall to prevent fractures.
  • Know your limits. Choose an activity and intensity level that suits your current level of physical fitness. If you’ve been inactive for a long period, your muscles are likely to be unconditioned, and shin splints, ankle sprains and other damage to your lower extremities are more likely to occur.
  • Know how to prepare. Warming up is just as essential for cold weather sports as it is for indoor activities. Stretch and try a couple of slow runs or an easy skate or sled before tackling more rigorous activity.
  • Know what to wear. The right gear is important for comfort and safety. In particular, your footwear needs to be specifically designed for the sport you are doing and also properly fitted. You’ll want your feet to stay warm and dry and also to have good support for your ankles. If you have a chronic problem or deformities such as Achilles tendonitis or Haglund’s deformity, have one of our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral, and Dr. Nrupa Shah conduct an examination of your feet and ankles. Ask the foot doctor for suggestions on how to best accommodate your foot problem in your sport.
  • Know what to do if you are injured. Always have a buddy with you and seek help promptly if you do sustain an injury. Contact our Edison, Monmouth Junction or Monroe office for non-emergent injuries or follow-ups by calling: 732-662-3050.
By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
October 30, 2018
Category: Haglunds Deformity

Do you have a painful bump on the back of your heel? Is it red and sometimes swollen? Does the pain get worse when you wear shoes with rigid backs? If yes, you may have Haglund’s Deformity, a condition we treat fairly often at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care. Although wearing pumps may make the symptoms of Haglund’s Deformity worse (hence the nickname of this condition, “pump bump”), it doesn’t actually cause the problem. Haglund’s Deformity develops as a result of faulty foot structure issues including:

  • Tight Achilles tendon
  • High arches
  • The tendency to walk on the outside of your heel

These structural defects can be genetic.

Treatment Options

Our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah, will first want to confirm the diagnosis of Haglund’s Deformity and rule out other possible conditions. To do this, the foot doctor will examine your heel and the rest of your feet and also order an x-ray, MRI, ultrasound or other diagnostic imaging tests. The type of treatment prescribed will have to do with the cause behind the deformity. Some possible options include:

  • Changes in footwear—wearing shoes made of soft materials and those with no backs will lessen pressure and pain on the bony enlargement.
  • Custom orthotics—the foot doctor may prescribe an orthotic to reposition the foot and help correct for a structural problem.
  • Immobilization—if the inflammation is severe, a soft case or walking boot may be used to allow time for healing to occur.
  • Heel pads—to cushion the bony protrusion and decrease pain
  • Heel lifts—if you have high arches, heel pads can help compensate.
  • Physical therapy
  • Stretching exercises—to loosen the Achilles tendon

If none of these options are successful, surgery may be recommended which can eliminate Haglund’s Deformity. Need more information on how to treat Haglund’s Deformity? Contact Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care at our Edison, Monroe, Linden or Monmouth Junction office in New Jersey by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
April 11, 2018
Category: Foot Health

In April we celebrate Foot Health Awareness Month. At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care, we thought this would be a good opportunity to dispel some myths that can hurt your feet. Many times, patients act on erroneous information that can lead to serious harm to the feet and ankles. Below are some of the more common myths we hear:

MYTH: Sticking cotton under the toenail is a good way to treat an ingrown nail. Wrong! Neither is cutting a notch in the nail or trying to dig out the ingrown nail with a sharp instrument. “Bathroom surgery” can lead to serious bacterial infection and disfiguring injuries. Have one of our podiatrists, Dr. Varun (Ben) Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah examine and treat any foot problems you are experiencing. Forget folk remedies when it comes to caring for foot conditions.

MYTH: Once you know your shoe size you can save time and buy shoes without trying them on. Unfortunately, shoe sizes are not standard across brands. If you buy shoes without trying them on and they are uncomfortable, many people just end up keeping them, which can greatly harm your feet. Shoes that are too tight in the toe box or rub in the wrong spot at the back of your heel hasten the development of crippling deformities, such as bunions and Haglund’s deformity (pump bump). In addition, your shoe size can change as you age or if you are pregnant. It’s best to have your foot professionally measured when you shop for shoes and then take your time trying them on and walking around to ensure comfort and proper fit.

MYTH: If you can walk on it, your foot or ankle is not sprained or broken. This myth has caused the worsening of many feet and ankle injuries. Being able to bear weight on an injured foot does not at all mean that it is not damaged. Sprains and fractures, particularly stress fractures, can hurt off and on after the initial injury. If you believe you have injured your foot or ankle, it’s important that you contact our Monmouth Junction, Edison or Monroe office in New Jersey as soon as possible and allow one of our foot doctors to evaluate your injury. Chronic conditions such as weak ankles and arthritis are often the result of not promptly treating and fully rehabilitating foot and ankle injuries.

Contact us at 732-662-3050 for any foot pain, injury or questions about your foot and ankle health.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
June 24, 2016

Many patients have a bony enlargement at the back of the heel, known as Haglund’s Deformity. When this enlargement becomes irritated, problems arise. At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care, we believe in educating our patients about common conditions.

Here are the facts about Haglund’s Deformity:

Women develop Haglund’s Deformity more often than men. The reason for this is that one of primary causes of irritation to the deformity is friction from the stiff backs of pump-style shoes. For this reason, Haglund’s Deformity is also referred to as “pump bump.” Of course, any stiff backed shoes, men’s or women’s, can aggravate this condition. These would include work boots, ice skates and men’s dress shoes. Left untreated, the irritation can result in bursitis or Achilles tendonitis.

Heredity plays a role in Haglund’s Deformity. There are certain structural issues with the foot that can be genetic which make patients more prone to this condition. These include:

  • Walking on the outside of the heel
  • A high arch
  • Tight Achilles tendon

There are many non-surgical treatment options available. While these treatments will not reduce the size of the bony protrusion, they can help minimize inflammation and pain. The foot doctor will first need to examine your heel and try to determine the reason you are suffering from Haglund’s Deformity. X-rays may be ordered to allow the podiatrist to see the foot structure. Depending on what’s causing the irritation, our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral or Dr. Nrupa Shah may recommend exercises to stretch the Achilles tendon, physical therapy, heel lifts and pads to reduce pressure on the heel and switching to shoes with very soft backs or no backs. The foot doctor may also suggest icing the affected heel and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications for pain until the treatment yields relief.

Don’t suffer unnecessarily. If you are experiencing pain on the back of your heel, contact our Monmouth Junction, Monroe or Edison office for an appointment by calling 732-662-3050.