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Posts for tag: Plantar Fasciitis

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
December 26, 2018
Category: Nutrition

Although no one wants to hear it in the middle of this festive eating season, the podiatrists at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care want to gently remind patients that excess weight is harmful to your feet. Unfortunately, every excess pound you carry exerts several extra pounds of pressure on your knees, ankles, and feet. This worsens existing podiatric conditions such as plantar fasciitis and arthritis and can even cause a new foot problem. The good news is, however, that you don’t have to deprive yourself of holiday treats! Below are a few tips for enjoying the festivities without going overboard.

  • Eat before you go to a holiday party. It may sound counterintuitive but many times the reason we overeat is our head—not our stomach! If you go to a party on an empty stomach, not only will you be hungrier and tend to eat more, you’ll feel justified having extras because you didn’t eat beforehand. In the long run, you’ll consume more calories.
  • Survey the buffet. Before you put anything on your plate, look at all the choices. Decide on a few splurge favorites and then fill the rest of your plate with healthier options from the veggie, fruit, and nut platters.
  • Eat and be done. Once you’ve finished with a plate of food, throw the plate away. Holding on to your plate is only going to entice you to put more on it.
  • Water down the drinks. Wine, beer, and other alcoholic beverages can quickly increase your calorie intake. Try alternating a full glass of water between drinks. Put it right in your fancy drink glass and you’ll feel more satisfied.
  • Help the hostess. If you’re busy clearing plates and washing dishes, you won’t have the opportunity to eat as much.

We hope you enjoy this holiday season without overdoing it. If you do find that you are experiencing new foot or ankle pain, however, don’t put off making an appointment at our Edison, Monroe, Monmouth Junction or Linden office in New Jersey. Our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah will examine your feet and carefully determine the source of your discomfort. Contact us for an appointment by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
September 26, 2018
Category: heel pain

At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we know that getting to the bottom of children’s foot pain can be tricky. Depending on the age of your child, it may be difficult to even know they have a foot problem because he or she may not be able to articulate fully the discomfort they are experiencing. In young children, parents may have to do a bit of sleuthing. If your child appears to be limping or walking in a funny way, complains that their legs are “tired,” or they seem to be avoiding physical activities and games they usually enjoy, these may be signs of foot pain. Ask your child to show you where on their foot it hurts. If they indicate the heel, here are a few potential causes:

Sever’s Disease—this is an inflammation of the growth plate which is at the back of the heel. Sever’s Disease is the most frequent cause of heel pain in children between the ages of 8 and 15. During those years the heel bone is in the process of developing. The area where new bone growth is forming is sensitive to repetitive stress and pounding. Sports activities such as soccer, basketball, gymnastics, and track can cause this area to become inflamed, which leads to severe pain that worsens with activity.

Plantar fasciitis—along the bottom of the foot, running from the heel to the toes, is a long band of tissue known as the plantar fascia. When the plantar fascia becomes inflamed, it can cause pain in the heel. Plantar fasciitis is most often caused by biomechanical dysfunction such as overly high arches or flat feet. Being overweight can increase the risk for this condition.

Poorly fitting shoes—sometimes heel pain in children is not from a medical condition but merely from shoes that don’t fit properly or are not correct for a particular activity. Too much time in cleats has been linked to Sever’s Disease. Children’s shoes should have adequate arch support and a cushioned sole that provides shock absorption for typical children’s activities. If your child has had a previous foot injury or is currently being treated for a chronic podiatric condition, check with our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah for recommendations of specific shoe designs that may best accommodate your child’s foot.

If your child is experiencing foot pain or you suspect there is a problem, contact our Edison, Monroe, Monmouth Junction or Linden office in New Jersey today for an appointment by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
September 18, 2018

September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month and here at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care, we have a vested interest in this cause. Why? Studies show that obese children often continue on to be obese in adulthood. Carrying excess weight is harmful to your feet and ankles. The added strain is a cause or contributing factor for many foot and ankle disorders, including plantar fasciitis, sesamoiditis, flat feet, chronic ankle instability, and more. In addition, being obese greatly increases your risk for systemic diseases—many of which also have serious consequences for your feet—like diabetes and hypertension. Below are some simple steps to take now to help prevent your child from becoming overweight:

  1. Make dietary changes. Obviously, food choices are a big factor in maintaining a healthy weight. Too many high fat and calorie snacks and processed foods are readily available and inexpensive. You don’t have to change your family’s entire diet overnight. Make small choices gradually:
  • Buy more fruit and less pre-packaged snacks and desserts.
  • Teach your children to read labels and look at sugar and fat content in the foods they eat.
  • Do away with sugary drinks and encourage your family to drink more water.
  • Decrease portion size.
  1. Step up physical activity. The other part of the calorie equation is burning more calories than you take in. Look for ways to enjoy more physical pursuits as a family: bike rides, hiking, raking leaves, and rollerblading together. Even simply taking a walk after dinner is a great way to add more active minutes to the day. If your child has had a foot or ankle injury, check with our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah, before starting new fitness activities.
  2. Put limits on screen time. Constant access to phones, computers, television, and video games will naturally disincline your child to participate in more active pursuits.
  3. Set regular bedtimes. Lack of sleep is a contributing factor to obesity. Now that school is back in session, create a schedule that allows your child to get enough sleep each night.
  4. Be a role model. Children learn by watching. If you show care about what you eat, being active and living a healthy lifestyle they will follow your example.

If you have questions about your child’s weight and foot health or have other podiatry concerns for you or your children, contact our Linden, Monroe, Edison or Monmouth Junction offices in New Jersey today by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
March 20, 2018
Category: heel pain
Tags: Plantar Fasciitis  

One of the most common foot problems that we see patients for at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care is heel pain. Heel pain can be extremely disabling, making it difficult to participate in activities you enjoy and even to complete daily tasks. Tracking down the cause of heel pain, however, is not always easy. When pain is not the result of a visual or surface issue such as heel fissures or Haglund’s deformity but is felt deep within the heel, our podiatrists Dr. Varun (Ben) Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah will need to do some investigating to get to the source of the pain. The foot doctor will start by examining your feet and ankles and getting your complete medical history, including any previous foot or ankle injuries you may have had. The podiatrist may also want you to have an x-ray, MRI, bone scan, or other imaging studies to get a better look at the inside of your foot to pinpoint (or rule out) possible reasons for your pain. In addition, you may be asked questions about your work, daily, and leisure activities.

In many cases, heel pain is not directly caused by a problem in the heel. Below are three common causes of heel pain where this is the case:

Plantar Fasciitis—the plantar fascia is a long band of tissue that connects your heel to your toes. This band can become inflamed due to arch problems (overly high arches or flat feet), overuse issues, inappropriate shoe choice or being overweight. The strain on the plantar fascia puts stress on your heel, causing pain and discomfort. One telltale sign of plantar fasciitis is sharp, stabbing pain when you first get out of bed or after you’ve been sitting for a while.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome—with this disorder a compressed nerve is the source of heel pain. The tarsal tunnel is a structure at the inside base of your ankle that houses the posterior tibial nerve (along with arteries, veins, and tendons). When the tunnel is squeezed (either due to injury, a foreign or enlarged object in the tunnel, such as a cyst or varicose vein, or a biomechanical problem), the nerve gets compressed and causes heel pain.

Back Issues—if you are experiencing pain in both heels and the foot doctor cannot find a problem with your feet or ankles, another possibility is that the pain is being caused by a back issue. Nerves that go down to your heels can be affected by spine disorders.

If you are experiencing heel pain, it’s important to make an appointment at our Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction office in New Jersey. We can help you find the cause of the pain and get started on a treatment plan that will alleviate it and prevent permanent damage. Contact us today by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
March 15, 2018
Category: Nutrition

March is National Nutrition Month and at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care, we want our patients to understand the direct relationship your weight has with the health and wellbeing of your feet and ankles. Being overweight significantly increases the risk and symptoms of many podiatric conditions including plantar fasciitis, arthritis and other joint disorders, flat feet, and metatarsalgia to name just a few. It’s simple: when you reduce your weight, you reduce the stress on all of your lower extremities. In addition, if you maintain a healthy weight, you are more likely to be active, which helps improve circulation, flexibility, and range of motion.

Adopting healthier eating habits doesn’t have to be difficult. Try some of these expert tips and slowly make over your family’s diet:

  • Increase nutrients in your menus and decrease waste by chopping up leftover vegetables and fruits, putting in bags and freezing. Pull out and add to soups, stews, stir-fries, and smoothies.
  • You don’t have to fully give up pasta, rice, and other carbohydrates, but choose whole grain instead of white flour versions and try this trick: place your lean protein and vegetables in the bowl first and then add a serving size of pasta. When you mix all ingredients together you tend to end up eating too much pasta.
  • Avoid the overly large portions at restaurants by ordering an appetizer or a la carte item off the menu and supplementing with a salad or side serving of steamed vegetables.
  • Get children involved by allowing them to pick out different and colorful vegetables, salad ingredients, and fruits at the grocery store. Let them help with preparing them as well.
  • Make some healthy swaps in your snack choices. Instead of puddings or ice cream, try dessert flavored yogurts that don’t have added sugars or artificial sweeteners, dried fruit instead of candy, and popcorn or baked tortilla chips in place of potato or corn chips.

If you are experiencing foot or ankle pain, contact our New Jersey offices in Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction. Our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah, will diagnose your disorder and advise you if weight loss or other lifestyle changes will help improve your condition. Call us at 732-662-3050.