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Posts for tag: Plantar Fasciitis

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
March 05, 2019
Category: Nutrition

March is National Nutrition Month, and at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care, we think this is a great opportunity to inform patients about the important ways that food affects the health of your feet.

Weight Watching

Everyone knows that what and how much you eat determines what you weigh. What you may not realize is the importance of maintaining a healthy weight for your feet. Since your feet carry the weight of your entire body, if you are overweight, you are putting excess strain on your feet. Weighing more than you should can be a risk factor for several foot conditions, including flat feet, plantar fasciitis, metatarsalgia, and sesamoiditis, to name a few. Being overweight increases your chances for systemic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease which can also have a negative impact on the health of your lower extremities.

Inflammation Fighters

Many podiatric conditions have inflammation as a primary symptom. Arthritis, Achilles tendonitis, and plantar fasciitis are examples of painful podiatric disorders brought about by inflammation. Studies have found that certain foods can trigger an inflammatory response in the body. Some of these include fried foods and foods high in sugar. Other foods, like berries, fish high Omega 3 fatty acids, and olive oil, can help suppress or reduce inflammation.

Gout Triggers

Certain foods can bring on a gout attack. Gout is a form of arthritis that most often strikes the big toe joint and is caused by too much uric acid in your body which crystallizes in the joint and results in severe pain. Foods to avoid include red meat, organ meats, beer, brandy, red wine, and shellfish.

The next time you are in for an appointment at our Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction office, ask our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah if you could improve a foot condition you have with modifications to your diet. You can contact us by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
February 06, 2019
Category: Heart Health
Tags: Diabetes   Plantar Fasciitis   orthotic   bunion  

February is National Heart Month. You may be wondering what that’s got to do with your feet, but at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we want our patients to recognize that the health of your heart does affect your feet and vice versa.

Know Your Risk

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in men and women. There are several factors that raise your risk for heart disease—some we can control and others we cannot:

  • Family history of heart disease
  • Being overweight
  • Having diabetes
  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Smoking
  • Lack of physical activity
  • Poor diet

Take Control

Fortunately, there is much you can do to prevent heart disease and live a long and active life. Start by being proactive and informed about your health. Talk to your physician about your risk factors and know your cholesterol and blood pressure numbers. Then, take steps to reduce your risk and develop a healthier lifestyle. Make small changes over time rather than dramatic ones that will be too difficult to maintain. Some examples:

  • Get moving. Talk to our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah about any recommendations for fitness activities based on your individual feet. If you have a bunion, plantar fasciitis or other chronic foot condition, the podiatrist may recommend a custom orthotic device to make exercise more comfortable.
  • Drink alcohol only in moderation.
  • Reduce stress. Exercise, meditation, seeing friends regularly or spending time doing a hobby or activity you enjoy can all be stress relievers. Make sure to put your stress relievers on your calendar just the same as you do other appointments and events.
  • Make healthy changes in your diet. Reduce portion sizes, substitute fruit, yogurt and healthy snacks for chips, cookies and other less healthy choices.
  • If you have diabetes, follow all of your doctor’s instructions for keeping it under control.
  • If you are a smoker, find a program to help you quit.

Keeping your heart healthy will enable you to stay active and do the things you love. The health of your feet is an integral part of your healthy lifestyle. If you have questions or concerns about podiatric conditions, contact our Monroe, Monmouth Junction or Edison office by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
December 26, 2018
Category: Nutrition

Although no one wants to hear it in the middle of this festive eating season, the podiatrists at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care want to gently remind patients that excess weight is harmful to your feet. Unfortunately, every excess pound you carry exerts several extra pounds of pressure on your knees, ankles, and feet. This worsens existing podiatric conditions such as plantar fasciitis and arthritis and can even cause a new foot problem. The good news is, however, that you don’t have to deprive yourself of holiday treats! Below are a few tips for enjoying the festivities without going overboard.

  • Eat before you go to a holiday party. It may sound counterintuitive but many times the reason we overeat is our head—not our stomach! If you go to a party on an empty stomach, not only will you be hungrier and tend to eat more, you’ll feel justified having extras because you didn’t eat beforehand. In the long run, you’ll consume more calories.
  • Survey the buffet. Before you put anything on your plate, look at all the choices. Decide on a few splurge favorites and then fill the rest of your plate with healthier options from the veggie, fruit, and nut platters.
  • Eat and be done. Once you’ve finished with a plate of food, throw the plate away. Holding on to your plate is only going to entice you to put more on it.
  • Water down the drinks. Wine, beer, and other alcoholic beverages can quickly increase your calorie intake. Try alternating a full glass of water between drinks. Put it right in your fancy drink glass and you’ll feel more satisfied.
  • Help the hostess. If you’re busy clearing plates and washing dishes, you won’t have the opportunity to eat as much.

We hope you enjoy this holiday season without overdoing it. If you do find that you are experiencing new foot or ankle pain, however, don’t put off making an appointment at our Edison, Monroe, Monmouth Junction or Linden office in New Jersey. Our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah will examine your feet and carefully determine the source of your discomfort. Contact us for an appointment by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
September 26, 2018
Category: heel pain

At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we know that getting to the bottom of children’s foot pain can be tricky. Depending on the age of your child, it may be difficult to even know they have a foot problem because he or she may not be able to articulate fully the discomfort they are experiencing. In young children, parents may have to do a bit of sleuthing. If your child appears to be limping or walking in a funny way, complains that their legs are “tired,” or they seem to be avoiding physical activities and games they usually enjoy, these may be signs of foot pain. Ask your child to show you where on their foot it hurts. If they indicate the heel, here are a few potential causes:

Sever’s Disease—this is an inflammation of the growth plate which is at the back of the heel. Sever’s Disease is the most frequent cause of heel pain in children between the ages of 8 and 15. During those years the heel bone is in the process of developing. The area where new bone growth is forming is sensitive to repetitive stress and pounding. Sports activities such as soccer, basketball, gymnastics, and track can cause this area to become inflamed, which leads to severe pain that worsens with activity.

Plantar fasciitis—along the bottom of the foot, running from the heel to the toes, is a long band of tissue known as the plantar fascia. When the plantar fascia becomes inflamed, it can cause pain in the heel. Plantar fasciitis is most often caused by biomechanical dysfunction such as overly high arches or flat feet. Being overweight can increase the risk for this condition.

Poorly fitting shoes—sometimes heel pain in children is not from a medical condition but merely from shoes that don’t fit properly or are not correct for a particular activity. Too much time in cleats has been linked to Sever’s Disease. Children’s shoes should have adequate arch support and a cushioned sole that provides shock absorption for typical children’s activities. If your child has had a previous foot injury or is currently being treated for a chronic podiatric condition, check with our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah for recommendations of specific shoe designs that may best accommodate your child’s foot.

If your child is experiencing foot pain or you suspect there is a problem, contact our Edison, Monroe, Monmouth Junction or Linden office in New Jersey today for an appointment by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
September 18, 2018

September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month and here at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care, we have a vested interest in this cause. Why? Studies show that obese children often continue on to be obese in adulthood. Carrying excess weight is harmful to your feet and ankles. The added strain is a cause or contributing factor for many foot and ankle disorders, including plantar fasciitis, sesamoiditis, flat feet, chronic ankle instability, and more. In addition, being obese greatly increases your risk for systemic diseases—many of which also have serious consequences for your feet—like diabetes and hypertension. Below are some simple steps to take now to help prevent your child from becoming overweight:

  1. Make dietary changes. Obviously, food choices are a big factor in maintaining a healthy weight. Too many high fat and calorie snacks and processed foods are readily available and inexpensive. You don’t have to change your family’s entire diet overnight. Make small choices gradually:
  • Buy more fruit and less pre-packaged snacks and desserts.
  • Teach your children to read labels and look at sugar and fat content in the foods they eat.
  • Do away with sugary drinks and encourage your family to drink more water.
  • Decrease portion size.
  1. Step up physical activity. The other part of the calorie equation is burning more calories than you take in. Look for ways to enjoy more physical pursuits as a family: bike rides, hiking, raking leaves, and rollerblading together. Even simply taking a walk after dinner is a great way to add more active minutes to the day. If your child has had a foot or ankle injury, check with our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah, before starting new fitness activities.
  2. Put limits on screen time. Constant access to phones, computers, television, and video games will naturally disincline your child to participate in more active pursuits.
  3. Set regular bedtimes. Lack of sleep is a contributing factor to obesity. Now that school is back in session, create a schedule that allows your child to get enough sleep each night.
  4. Be a role model. Children learn by watching. If you show care about what you eat, being active and living a healthy lifestyle they will follow your example.

If you have questions about your child’s weight and foot health or have other podiatry concerns for you or your children, contact our Linden, Monroe, Edison or Monmouth Junction offices in New Jersey today by calling: 732-662-3050.