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Posts for tag: bunion

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
March 27, 2019
Category: Bunions

At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we want to dispel the notion that there’s nothing that can be done for a bunion short of surgery. Yes, it’s true that a surgical procedure is necessary to correct or eliminate a bunion, but our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral, and Dr. Nrupa Shah have many treatment methods that can decrease pain and slow the progression of your bunion, enabling you to continue to enjoy an active lifestyle. These include:

Protective Padding—one of the major sources of pain for bunion patients is friction from where the bunion rubs against the inside of the shoes. Padding made of felt, gel or other material can provide a protective cushion and reduce skin inflammation.

Corn and Callus Removal—over time, constant friction and pressure caused by the bunion can result in secondary problems like calluses and corns forming on the toe. These, in turn, increase pain and discomfort. Removing them can bring some relief.

Shoe Modifications—your shoes can be one of the biggest causes of bunion growth. Choose styles that have a wide toe box and low heels. Narrow, pointy shoes encourage the big toe to move out of place. The podiatrist may also prescribe a custom orthotic device to wear inside your shoes to help stabilize the joint and keep your foot stay in the correct position.

Night Splints—the foot doctor may recommend splints to wear while you sleep that will help your toes and joints align properly. These are particularly effective for adolescents whose bones are still developing.

Exercises—there are a number of exercises that are designed to maintain range of motion and joint flexibility which can be helpful in preventing stiffness in the toe or arthritis setting in.

Don’t wait until your bunion is so painful that you can no longer walk properly. Make an appointment at our Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction office as soon as possible by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
February 06, 2019
Category: Heart Health
Tags: Diabetes   Plantar Fasciitis   orthotic   bunion  

February is National Heart Month. You may be wondering what that’s got to do with your feet, but at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we want our patients to recognize that the health of your heart does affect your feet and vice versa.

Know Your Risk

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in men and women. There are several factors that raise your risk for heart disease—some we can control and others we cannot:

  • Family history of heart disease
  • Being overweight
  • Having diabetes
  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Smoking
  • Lack of physical activity
  • Poor diet

Take Control

Fortunately, there is much you can do to prevent heart disease and live a long and active life. Start by being proactive and informed about your health. Talk to your physician about your risk factors and know your cholesterol and blood pressure numbers. Then, take steps to reduce your risk and develop a healthier lifestyle. Make small changes over time rather than dramatic ones that will be too difficult to maintain. Some examples:

  • Get moving. Talk to our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah about any recommendations for fitness activities based on your individual feet. If you have a bunion, plantar fasciitis or other chronic foot condition, the podiatrist may recommend a custom orthotic device to make exercise more comfortable.
  • Drink alcohol only in moderation.
  • Reduce stress. Exercise, meditation, seeing friends regularly or spending time doing a hobby or activity you enjoy can all be stress relievers. Make sure to put your stress relievers on your calendar just the same as you do other appointments and events.
  • Make healthy changes in your diet. Reduce portion sizes, substitute fruit, yogurt and healthy snacks for chips, cookies and other less healthy choices.
  • If you have diabetes, follow all of your doctor’s instructions for keeping it under control.
  • If you are a smoker, find a program to help you quit.

Keeping your heart healthy will enable you to stay active and do the things you love. The health of your feet is an integral part of your healthy lifestyle. If you have questions or concerns about podiatric conditions, contact our Monroe, Monmouth Junction or Edison office by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
August 29, 2018
Category: Bunions

That’s a question that we at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care hear frequently during when summer comes to an end. The reason is that many women spend the warmer months in sandals and flip-flops. These open shoes don’t put pressure on a bunion. Once fall arrives and foot fashions switch to closed shoes the pain seems worse than ever. And, it may well be more painful. Bunions, the bony protrusion at the base of the big toe, are deformities that occur because the toe begins to drift toward the second toe. It’s a progressive condition and one that will only get more pronounced and painful as time goes on.

Non-Surgical Options

As soon as you suspect that you may have a bunion forming, it’s important that you make an appointment at our Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction office in New Jersey. Our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah will conduct a complete examination of your feet. We will most likely take x-rays or do other imaging studies to determine the extent of the bunion. Our foot doctors will use those images to monitor the progression of your bunion. In the early stages, bunions can be treated with conservative measures including:

  • Protective padding to reduce friction and pain
  • Footwear that will accommodate the bunion and not accelerate its growth
  • Orthotic inserts for your shoes to correctly position your foot and stabilize the toe joint
  • Exercises to promote joint mobility and range of motion
  • Night splints to help properly align the joint

Bunion Surgery

Although non-invasive measures may slow the progression of a bunion and help increase your comfort, they will not eliminate it. The only way to correct a bunion deformity is through surgery. There are several types of bunionectomies. The foot doctor will choose the one that best suits your joint deformity. Bunion surgeries have a high rate of success. Many patients choose to have this surgery in the fall when they know summer vacation is over and they have some down time before the busy holiday season arrives.

If your bunion pain is becoming unbearable, contact us for an appointment today by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
March 28, 2018
Tags: stress fracture   bunion  

Before March is history, we at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care want to recognize Women’s History Month by offering some important podiatric health care information about conditions that particularly affect women.

  1. Bunions—this deformity is caused by a biomechanical problem that encourages the big toe to move out of place at the base joint and drift toward the second toe. Why, then, is this more of an issue for men than women? While both sexes may have the faulty foot structure (which is often inherited), women are far more likely to have the condition progress to the point where the telltale bump forms on the side of the foot causing pain and making it difficult to wear shoes. This is due largely to shoe choice. High heels and narrow, pointy toes forcibly squeeze the toes together and put pressure on the big toe, aiding in its dislocation. There are, however, both conservative and surgical measures that can help slow the progression or correct a bunion.
  2. Stress fractures—these tiny cracks in the surface of a foot bone, most often on the top of the forefoot, are frequently the way that a woman learns that she has osteoporosis. This condition will ultimately affect 1 in 2 women over the age of 50. Adequate amounts of calcium, as well as weight-bearing exercise done regularly, can help prevent this order. It’s important to realize that symptoms of a stress fracture may be intermittent and not appear very serious at first. Pain and swelling that cannot be explained by an injury require an evaluation by the foot doctor.
  3. Morton’s neuroma—this disorder is particularly prevalent among runners. Pain, tingling, and burning sensations in the ball of the foot or the feeling that there is a pebble in your shoe all the time are signs of this nerve irritation. What gives women runners a greater likelihood than men for developing this condition is that in addition to the repetitive stress on the ball of the foot from running, wearing platform or high heeled shoes also applies pressure to the same part of the foot.

In all of the above situations, there are measures that can be taken both proactively and in the early stages of the disorder that can greatly decrease the chance of disability or surgery. Let our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah examine your feet and diagnose your pain sooner rather than later. Contact our New Jersey offices in Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction at 732-662-3050.