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Posts for tag: corns

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
May 15, 2019
Category: Pedicures

As the temperatures finally begin to rise in our part of New Jersey, we at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care know that many of our patients can’t wait to get out their open-toed shoes and summer sandals. And, what better way to prepare your feet for these styles than with a pretty pedicure? We also are aware, however, that there is some hesitation about salon pedicures because of the risk of fungal and bacterial infections. If you don’t have a regular salon that you trust and who you know observes proper sanitizing procedures, we offer these steps for a do-it-yourself pedicure that will yield relaxing and attractive results.

  • Start by soaking your feet in warm, soapy water for about 10 minutes to soften skin and clean toenails.
  • Next, gently rub skin with a pumice stone to get rid of dead skin and calluses. If you have deep calluses or corns that need attention, contact us for assistance.
  • Push back cuticles with an orange stick or Hindu stone. Carefully trim only to the nail margin.
  • Cut toenails straight across and not too short (to help prevent ingrown nails).
  • Smooth the edges with an emery board.
  • Apply cream or moisturizing lotion to the skin around your nails and then to your whole foot. Massage it into your feet, rubbing the ball of the foot and heel, as well as the fore and midfoot. Reflexologists believe that a good foot massage can positively impact other parts of your body as well, plus it feels great!
  • Use nail polish remover to remove excess lotion on the toenails. This will allow the polish to adhere better.
  • Apply a base coat, then two coats of nail color and finish with a top coat.
  • Voila! Beautiful nails with no risk of fungal infections.

Doing an at-home pedicure is also a great opportunity to examine your entire foot and your toenails. If you notice any unusual growths, lumps, swelling or bruising, schedule an appointment our Edison, Monroe, or Monmouth Junction office (732-662-3050) to get your symptoms evaluated by our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
March 27, 2019
Category: Bunions

At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we want to dispel the notion that there’s nothing that can be done for a bunion short of surgery. Yes, it’s true that a surgical procedure is necessary to correct or eliminate a bunion, but our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral, and Dr. Nrupa Shah have many treatment methods that can decrease pain and slow the progression of your bunion, enabling you to continue to enjoy an active lifestyle. These include:

Protective Padding—one of the major sources of pain for bunion patients is friction from where the bunion rubs against the inside of the shoes. Padding made of felt, gel or other material can provide a protective cushion and reduce skin inflammation.

Corn and Callus Removal—over time, constant friction and pressure caused by the bunion can result in secondary problems like calluses and corns forming on the toe. These, in turn, increase pain and discomfort. Removing them can bring some relief.

Shoe Modifications—your shoes can be one of the biggest causes of bunion growth. Choose styles that have a wide toe box and low heels. Narrow, pointy shoes encourage the big toe to move out of place. The podiatrist may also prescribe a custom orthotic device to wear inside your shoes to help stabilize the joint and keep your foot stay in the correct position.

Night Splints—the foot doctor may recommend splints to wear while you sleep that will help your toes and joints align properly. These are particularly effective for adolescents whose bones are still developing.

Exercises—there are a number of exercises that are designed to maintain range of motion and joint flexibility which can be helpful in preventing stiffness in the toe or arthritis setting in.

Don’t wait until your bunion is so painful that you can no longer walk properly. Make an appointment at our Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction office as soon as possible by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
January 16, 2019
Category: Diabetic Foot Care

Are you one of 29 million Americans that have diabetes? If so, all of us at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care want you to know that you have significant power in controlling this disease and how it affects your feet. Diabetes deals your feet a double blow: first, it can cause neuropathy or nerve damage to the feet which makes it difficult to detect cuts or injuries to the feet. Second, diabetes can impede circulation which restricts the flow of oxygen-rich blood that can speed healing to the extremities.

There are steps you can take, however, to help protect your feet if you have diabetes:

  • Keep your sugar levels under control. Following all your doctor’s instructions for managing your diabetes will lower your risk for complications significantly.
  • Get in the habit of doing self-exams. Check your feet daily for cuts, open sores, blisters, swelling, bruising, changes in skin color or nail condition. Report anything unusual to our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah so that they can examine your feet and adjust your treatment accordingly.
  • Choose shoes wisely. Get your foot professionally measured and choose shoes that have a roomy toe box and are made out of soft, flexible materials. Look over your feet for red marks, blisters or other signs of friction from your footwear.
  • Keep feet dry. Wear socks made of moisture-wicking materials that help feet stay dry. Change socks as soon as your feet feel damp. If you tend to sweat profusely, use an anti-fungal foot powder before putting on socks.
  • Avoid going barefoot. Even at home, bare feet are more likely to sustain a puncture wound or cut from stepping on a sharp object. Your risk for athlete’s foot or fungal infections decreases if you keep your feet covered when walking in public places.
  • Don’t practice “bathroom surgery.” Attempting to remove warts, corns or calluses or dig out ingrown toenails is likely to result in injury and infection which could pose a significant medical threat.
  • Schedule regular podiatric checkups. Your foot doctor is your partner in managing your diabetes. If you have questions about your feet and diabetes, contact our New Jersey locations in Edison, Monroe, Linden or Monmouth Junction by calling: 732-662-3050.
By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
November 06, 2018
Category: Diabetic Foot Care
Tags: Diabetes   calluses   corns   warts   ingrown toenails  

At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we know that our patients with diabetes are at increased risk for dangerous foot issues. That’s because the disease delivers a one, two punch. Neuropathy makes it difficult to detect foot problems and injuries in the first place so that often, by the time they are discovered, they are at an advanced stage. Then poor circulation impedes the healing process, causing even commonplace conditions such as ingrown toenails to become a potentially serious problem.

Fortunately, there are lots of ways to reduce your risk. Below are simple tips for preventing foot problems if you have diabetes:

  1. Trim toenails straight across. Don’t cut the corners and avoid round edges.
  2. Keep feet dry at all times. If you sweat profusely, change socks throughout the day if necessary.
  3. Wash feet daily with warm water and mild soap.
  4. Dry between your toes.
  5. No bathroom surgery! Do not attempt to dig out ingrown nails or trim calluses, corns or warts with sharp instruments.
  6. Keep feet warm.
  7. Don’t put your feet on radiators or directly in front of a fireplace or woodstove.
  8. Don’t smoke—it impedes circulation.
  9. Keep feet moisturized. Apply a good quality lotion to your feet daily but avoid the area between your toes.
  10. Do not wear socks with tight elastic tops.
  11. Choose shoes that have roomy toe boxes and keep heels to a height of 2 inches or less.
  12. Wear loose socks to bed.
  13. Inspect your feet daily. Look for cuts, bruises and swelling. Report any unusual changes in color, shape or appearance of skin or toes to our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah immediately.
  14. Keep your blood sugar under control and follow all of your doctor’s instructions for managing your diabetes.

If you have additional questions about diabetes and your feet, contact our podiatry offices in Edison, Monroe, Monmouth Junction or Linden, New Jersey by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
July 11, 2018
Category: toe deformities
Tags: hammertoe   corns   orthotic  

At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care, when a patient comes in with the early signs of a hammertoe we sometimes have to convince them that this is not merely a cosmetic issue. Hammertoe is a progressive condition most often caused by a muscle/tendon imbalance. As time goes on, the bend in the toe becomes more severe and increasingly rigid. Pain, inflammation and a burning sensation may develop in the affected toe. In addition, wearing shoes becomes difficult due to the fact that the bent toe is constantly being pressed up against the front of the shoe. Secondary conditions, such as corns, calluses and even open sores on the hammertoe are also a possibility.

Creating a Treatment Plan

Our podiatrists, Dr. Varun (Ben) Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah, will want to monitor the progression of your hammertoe. As part of the initial diagnosis, the foot doctor will most likely take an x-ray of the hammertoe. This can be used as a reference point going forward that will show when and how the deformity is changing. Depending on the severity and rate of progression, the foot doctor will determine the best treatment options for you.

If you are in pain, getting relief will be a top priority. The podiatrist may recommend using a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication such as ibuprofen or undergoing corticosteroid injections. If you’re suffering from corns or calluses, padding can help protect those areas and prevent them from worsening.

Modifying your footwear can also relieve pain and help correct the muscle/tendon problem. Avoiding high heels (over two inches) and choosing styles that have roomy toe boxes will definitely be more comfortable. The foot doctor may also order a custom orthotic device to wear inside your shoe.

Another approach to correcting a hammertoe is trying to straighten out the toe and properly realign it. The can be done with splints or straps that help move and keep the toe in the correct position.

It’s important to realize that hammertoe will only get worse and not better without some treatment measures. If you have noticed a bend in one of your toes, contact our New Jersey offices in Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction by calling 732-662-3050 to learn if you have a hammertoe and what is the best way to proceed.