732-662-3050

 




 
 

 

Posts for tag: hammertoe

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
August 08, 2018
Category: Footwear

Ask yourself these two questions: are my feet hurting more than usual? How much time do I spend in my flip-flops? At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we know that flip-flops are a popular footwear choice especially during the summer months, but they can pose a serious risk to your feet. Although flip-flops are a good choice around the pool or when using the shower at the gym, they can do harm to your feet if you wear them as your primary shoe. Below are several reasons to re-think wearing flip-flops on a daily basis:

flip-flop

Increased risk of hammertoe—have you ever noticed how your toes have to work extra hard to grip the front of the flip-flops to keep them on? That repeated bending of the toe joint can eventually affect the biomechanics of your toes, causing them to become stiff and rigid in the bent hammertoe position. Switch to sandals that have an ankle strap instead.

Slips, falls and ankle sprains—flip-flops have nothing holding your foot in place. Never run in flip-flops and if a pick-up game of volleyball starts up at the beach, change into sneakers before joining in. The lack of side support makes it easy to twist your ankle, stub or cut your toe or trip on the front of the shoe.

A pain in the lower extremities—because flip-flops have zero arch support, you may experience symptoms similar to flat feet. These include stabbing pains in your arch and heel. Your joints try to compensate for the lack of arch in the shoe and this can throw your whole lower body out of alignment and cause aches and pains in your calves (Achilles tendonitis), knees, hips, and back.

Slow burn for calories—the effort to keep flip-flops on makes you take small steps and move more slowly. That means you’re burning fewer calories when you walk than you do when wearing sneakers.

Overexposure—the skin on your feet is exposed on all sides--except the sole--to whatever dirt, bacteria, and fungi are on the ground where you are walking when wearing flip-flops, increasing your risk of fungal infections and warts.

If you still are reluctant to give up your daily use of flip-flops, at least look into purchasing styles that have an arch added to them and better support for your foot. If you are experiencing foot, ankle or calf pain or toe problems, contact our Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction offices in New Jersey by calling 732-662-3050 and make an appointment with one of our podiatrists, Dr. Ben (Varun) Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah, and get relief.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
July 11, 2018
Category: toe deformities
Tags: hammertoe   corns   orthotic  

At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care, when a patient comes in with the early signs of a hammertoe we sometimes have to convince them that this is not merely a cosmetic issue. Hammertoe is a progressive condition most often caused by a muscle/tendon imbalance. As time goes on, the bend in the toe becomes more severe and increasingly rigid. Pain, inflammation and a burning sensation may develop in the affected toe. In addition, wearing shoes becomes difficult due to the fact that the bent toe is constantly being pressed up against the front of the shoe. Secondary conditions, such as corns, calluses and even open sores on the hammertoe are also a possibility.

Creating a Treatment Plan

Our podiatrists, Dr. Varun (Ben) Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah, will want to monitor the progression of your hammertoe. As part of the initial diagnosis, the foot doctor will most likely take an x-ray of the hammertoe. This can be used as a reference point going forward that will show when and how the deformity is changing. Depending on the severity and rate of progression, the foot doctor will determine the best treatment options for you.

If you are in pain, getting relief will be a top priority. The podiatrist may recommend using a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication such as ibuprofen or undergoing corticosteroid injections. If you’re suffering from corns or calluses, padding can help protect those areas and prevent them from worsening.

Modifying your footwear can also relieve pain and help correct the muscle/tendon problem. Avoiding high heels (over two inches) and choosing styles that have roomy toe boxes will definitely be more comfortable. The foot doctor may also order a custom orthotic device to wear inside your shoe.

Another approach to correcting a hammertoe is trying to straighten out the toe and properly realign it. The can be done with splints or straps that help move and keep the toe in the correct position.

It’s important to realize that hammertoe will only get worse and not better without some treatment measures. If you have noticed a bend in one of your toes, contact our New Jersey offices in Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction by calling 732-662-3050 to learn if you have a hammertoe and what is the best way to proceed.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
March 16, 2016
Tags: hammertoe  

Hammertoe is a deformity where the toe is bent at the middle joint, giving it the appearance of a hammer. It most often affects the second, third or fourth toe. Hammertoes cause pain both from keeping the toe in a bent position and from the discomfort of wearing shoes. Corns and calluses may form on the top of the toe joint or the tip of the toe due to the abnormal position and can eventually result in open sores.

Treatment Options

At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care, our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah will take a detailed medical history and then conduct a thorough examination of the toes. Although the hammer-like appearance may be obvious, there are other conditions that have similar symptoms to hammertoe and correct diagnosis is necessary before treatment can begin. X-rays may also be ordered to help confirm the diagnosis.

There are several non-surgical avenues of treatment available for hammertoe. These include:

  • Medication: oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or cortisone injections may be part of the initial treatment to reduce pain and inflammation
  • Padding: if your hammertoe has progressed to the point where corns or calluses have already formed, the podiatrist may recommend pads to prevent additional irritation
  • Orthotics: custom designed inserts for shoes can help correct the muscle imbalance that is one of the primary causes of the deformity
  • Strapping or splinting: the foot doctor may put splints or straps on the affected toe to help realign and straighten the toe
  • Exercise: stretching and strengthening surrounding muscles can provide needed support to the bent toe

Hammertoe is a progressive disorder and will only get worse if not treated. Eventually, the toe will become frozen in the hammer position and surgery may then become the only option for correcting the deformity and avoiding disability. If you have signs of hammertoe, contact our Edison, Monroe, or Monmouth Junction office for an appointment and get treatment for your toe condition before it becomes a major medical problem.