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Posts for tag: stress fracture

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
December 18, 2018
Category: Fractures
Tags: stress fracture   fracture  

Broken toes are an injury that we at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care find patients may not fully understand. There is misinformation about toe fractures that can actually lead those with this injury to a much longer and more painful road to recovery. Below are some questions and answers to help clear up falsehoods about toe fractures.

Is there anything the foot doctor can really do for a broken toe?

This is a common question because many people believe there’s nothing that can be done for a broken toe so there’s no point going to the podiatrist. This is incorrect! In fact, not treating a fractured toe can lead to chronic pain and permanent deformity or surgery to correct a toe that heals incompletely.

If I can still walk my toe isn’t broken, right?

Wrong! It is possible to walk with a broken toe. Sometimes a stress fracture occurs in a toe bone. This is a hairline break in the surface of the bone. A stress fracture comes about gradually as the result of excessive and repeated pressure on one part of the bone. The pain may come with activity and subside with rest.

What are the signs of a broken toe?

In the case of an acute fracture when trauma occurs to the toe you may hear a cracking or popping sound at the time of the injury. There will most likely be pain at the fracture site, but it may go away after several hours. Don’t be fooled, however. The break is still there. The toe may have a crooked or bent appearance. You may also see bruising or swelling the day after the injury.

What’s the treatment for a broken toe?

That will depend on the extent of the break. Our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah, have several options from splinting and taping a broken toe to surgery. After examining your toe and doing x-rays or other imaging studies, they will determine the best treatment for you.

If you suspect you may have a broken toe, contact our New Jersey offices in Edison, Monroe, Monmouth Junction or Linden office today for an appointment by calling: 732-662-3050. 

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
March 28, 2018
Tags: stress fracture   bunion  

Before March is history, we at Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care want to recognize Women’s History Month by offering some important podiatric health care information about conditions that particularly affect women.

  1. Bunions—this deformity is caused by a biomechanical problem that encourages the big toe to move out of place at the base joint and drift toward the second toe. Why, then, is this more of an issue for men than women? While both sexes may have the faulty foot structure (which is often inherited), women are far more likely to have the condition progress to the point where the telltale bump forms on the side of the foot causing pain and making it difficult to wear shoes. This is due largely to shoe choice. High heels and narrow, pointy toes forcibly squeeze the toes together and put pressure on the big toe, aiding in its dislocation. There are, however, both conservative and surgical measures that can help slow the progression or correct a bunion.
  2. Stress fractures—these tiny cracks in the surface of a foot bone, most often on the top of the forefoot, are frequently the way that a woman learns that she has osteoporosis. This condition will ultimately affect 1 in 2 women over the age of 50. Adequate amounts of calcium, as well as weight-bearing exercise done regularly, can help prevent this order. It’s important to realize that symptoms of a stress fracture may be intermittent and not appear very serious at first. Pain and swelling that cannot be explained by an injury require an evaluation by the foot doctor.
  3. Morton’s neuroma—this disorder is particularly prevalent among runners. Pain, tingling, and burning sensations in the ball of the foot or the feeling that there is a pebble in your shoe all the time are signs of this nerve irritation. What gives women runners a greater likelihood than men for developing this condition is that in addition to the repetitive stress on the ball of the foot from running, wearing platform or high heeled shoes also applies pressure to the same part of the foot.

In all of the above situations, there are measures that can be taken both proactively and in the early stages of the disorder that can greatly decrease the chance of disability or surgery. Let our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah examine your feet and diagnose your pain sooner rather than later. Contact our New Jersey offices in Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction at 732-662-3050.

NBA big men have recently been touted as being “injury-prone” secondary to current and past players being injured so often. From Greg Oden to Bill Walton, forwards and centers just can’t seem to catch a break. And now, the number 3 overall pick in the 2014 NBA draft, Joel Embiid is projected to miss his second straight season due to a stress fracture he suffered prior to draft day in his right foot. Embiid is scheduled to have surgery which will cause him to be sidelined for the 2015-16 season.

Usually, foot surgeries do not sideline players for an entire season. However, the Philadelphia 76’s want to make sure Embiid is 100% for the following season. Stress fractures can be caused my numerous things but most commonly they’re caused by overuse. It’s unknown what part of the foot Embiid injured, but the most common bones injured by stress fractures are the 2nd and 5th metatarsal bones. The metatarsal bones are the bones that attach to your toes and are essentially in the middle of your foot. Lots of force is transmitted through this area and that is the reason why stress fractures are commonly found here. Your local podiatrists at Affiliated Foot and Ankle Care located in Monroe and Edison, NJ see and treat many stress fractures. Depending on the severity of the fracture they can sometimes be treated conservatively with proper offloading and RICE. However, for displaced, intra-articular fractures surgery is definitely warranted and depending on the type of patient, the recovery period is at the discretion of the surgeon. In Embiid’s case it will be at the discretion of his contract AND surgeon.

Fractures of the foot are common and can be extremely difficult to heal mainly because it’s hard to keep the patient off their injured foot.  Typically patients are off their foot for 6-8 weeks because that’s how long it takes bone to fully heal. Embiid is unfortunate that this is the second time he is having surgery and that he will be out for a second consecutive season. The 76’s are in dire need of Joel’s presence seeing as how he was the Pac 12 defensive player of the year.

By Varun Gujral

 

What exactly is a stress fracture of the foot? This injury is tiny cracks in the weight bearing bones of your foot, which result from overuse due to running, basketball, gymnastics or other high demand sports. Football is another sport where this injury is very common and likely, Mohamed Sanu, a wide receiver for the Cincinnati Bengals was placed on the injured reserve list on December 4thfrom this injury.

These sports cause the muscles in your foot to become tired and less able to absorb the shock from the impact being placed on them, so the shock is displaced to the bones of your feet creating tiny cracks. The most common place in the foot for this to occur is on the second and third metatarsals and the calcaneus bone. Wait what…? These are the bones of your second and third toes and your heel!

Some common symptoms of foot stress fractures include pain that gets worse while bearing weight on your foot and goes away with rest, swelling on the top of foot or ankle, tenderness and bruising on the top of the foot or ankle.

Diagnosis and treatment of this injury is very important so that worse problems do not develop. Your podiatrist can diagnose the injury with a simple x-ray and examination of the foot. After the diagnosis has been made rest is very important! If you do not rest you can cause the bone to break completely and surgery will be required. Along with rest keeping weight off your foot is essential; your podiatrist will recommend either protective footwear or a cast until the cracks heal completely. In some cases surgery in required to stabilize the bones, but in a majority of cases rest and casting will heal the bones.

However after the bones heal it is important to not jump back into your normal activity level, you need to ease yourself back into the activities you did before the injury. If you jump right back into the high stress activity you were doing before you could injure yourself again and it could be worse this time.

But if you want to avoid the chance of this injury all together here are a few tips for prevention! Always gradually ease yourself into any new activity, use strength training to keep your muscles able to handle the stress you’re putting on them and also alternate your activities, repetitive motion can be stressful to your bones.

By: Varun Gujral