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Posts for tag: warts

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
November 06, 2018
Category: Diabetic Foot Care
Tags: Diabetes   calluses   corns   warts   ingrown toenails  

At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we know that our patients with diabetes are at increased risk for dangerous foot issues. That’s because the disease delivers a one, two punch. Neuropathy makes it difficult to detect foot problems and injuries in the first place so that often, by the time they are discovered, they are at an advanced stage. Then poor circulation impedes the healing process, causing even commonplace conditions such as ingrown toenails to become a potentially serious problem.

Fortunately, there are lots of ways to reduce your risk. Below are simple tips for preventing foot problems if you have diabetes:

  1. Trim toenails straight across. Don’t cut the corners and avoid round edges.
  2. Keep feet dry at all times. If you sweat profusely, change socks throughout the day if necessary.
  3. Wash feet daily with warm water and mild soap.
  4. Dry between your toes.
  5. No bathroom surgery! Do not attempt to dig out ingrown nails or trim calluses, corns or warts with sharp instruments.
  6. Keep feet warm.
  7. Don’t put your feet on radiators or directly in front of a fireplace or woodstove.
  8. Don’t smoke—it impedes circulation.
  9. Keep feet moisturized. Apply a good quality lotion to your feet daily but avoid the area between your toes.
  10. Do not wear socks with tight elastic tops.
  11. Choose shoes that have roomy toe boxes and keep heels to a height of 2 inches or less.
  12. Wear loose socks to bed.
  13. Inspect your feet daily. Look for cuts, bruises and swelling. Report any unusual changes in color, shape or appearance of skin or toes to our podiatrists, Dr. Ben Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah immediately.
  14. Keep your blood sugar under control and follow all of your doctor’s instructions for managing your diabetes.

If you have additional questions about diabetes and your feet, contact our podiatry offices in Edison, Monroe, Monmouth Junction or Linden, New Jersey by calling: 732-662-3050.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
August 08, 2018
Category: Footwear

Ask yourself these two questions: are my feet hurting more than usual? How much time do I spend in my flip-flops? At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we know that flip-flops are a popular footwear choice especially during the summer months, but they can pose a serious risk to your feet. Although flip-flops are a good choice around the pool or when using the shower at the gym, they can do harm to your feet if you wear them as your primary shoe. Below are several reasons to re-think wearing flip-flops on a daily basis:

flip-flop

Increased risk of hammertoe—have you ever noticed how your toes have to work extra hard to grip the front of the flip-flops to keep them on? That repeated bending of the toe joint can eventually affect the biomechanics of your toes, causing them to become stiff and rigid in the bent hammertoe position. Switch to sandals that have an ankle strap instead.

Slips, falls and ankle sprains—flip-flops have nothing holding your foot in place. Never run in flip-flops and if a pick-up game of volleyball starts up at the beach, change into sneakers before joining in. The lack of side support makes it easy to twist your ankle, stub or cut your toe or trip on the front of the shoe.

A pain in the lower extremities—because flip-flops have zero arch support, you may experience symptoms similar to flat feet. These include stabbing pains in your arch and heel. Your joints try to compensate for the lack of arch in the shoe and this can throw your whole lower body out of alignment and cause aches and pains in your calves (Achilles tendonitis), knees, hips, and back.

Slow burn for calories—the effort to keep flip-flops on makes you take small steps and move more slowly. That means you’re burning fewer calories when you walk than you do when wearing sneakers.

Overexposure—the skin on your feet is exposed on all sides--except the sole--to whatever dirt, bacteria, and fungi are on the ground where you are walking when wearing flip-flops, increasing your risk of fungal infections and warts.

If you still are reluctant to give up your daily use of flip-flops, at least look into purchasing styles that have an arch added to them and better support for your foot. If you are experiencing foot, ankle or calf pain or toe problems, contact our Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction offices in New Jersey by calling 732-662-3050 and make an appointment with one of our podiatrists, Dr. Ben (Varun) Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah, and get relief.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
July 18, 2018
Category: Pedicures

Remember that game they used to have in children’s magazines—what’s wrong with this picture? At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we want our clients who like to get professional pedicures to use those same skills when visiting the nail salon. Fungal toenails, athlete’s foot, and warts are all easily spread by direct contact. A nail salon can be a high-risk zone due to the fact that there are many people there with bare feet. Before getting a pedicure, take a look around the salon to see if you spot any of the following which may be a red flag for an unsafe pedicure:

Nail technicians don’t get up between clients—there are a few reasons why this is a problem. First, nail technicians should wash their hands each time before starting a new pedicure. More importantly, however, you want to be sure the tools being used for your pedicure have not touched someone else’s feet. That means you should see tools coming out of an autoclave (a sterilizing machine that looks like a toaster oven) or a liquid sanitizing solution. The only good possibility if nail technicians don’t get up to get clean tools is that they are using one-time disposable tools that come in a sealed package.

The only thing decorating the walls is pictures from old calendars—no we’re not being snobby about the décor. What should be prominently displayed in the salon is a license from the state cosmetology or health department. This means that the salon meets certain standards for cleanliness and follows safe sanitizing procedures.

There are no flip-flops for sale—no one should be walking barefoot in the salon. If you forget to bring a pair, a salon that is concerned with not spreading fungal infections should either sell flip-flops or have some type of disposable foot covering for clients.

The magazines in the waiting area are a mess—seems minor but if being sanitary and clean are important to a salon, it should show overall. This means the restrooms, floor, mirrors, and workstations should all be neat and tidy. If it just doesn’t feel clean, look elsewhere for you a place for your pedicure.

If you suspect you may have already contracted a fungal nail or foot infection, make an appointment at our New Jersey offices in Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction by calling: 732-662-3050 so that our podiatrists, Dr. Varun (Ben) Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah, can examine your feet and determine if an infection is present.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
January 10, 2018
Category: Foot Care

If you’re like many people, you may have watched the ball drop on New Year’s Eve. At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care, it inspired us to think about a countdown to better foot care. It’s a resolution we think should be on all of our patients’ lists. Let these 10 tips put you on the path to healthier, happier feet:

10: Don’t smoke. Smoking not only increases your risk of several major diseases and is bad for your lungs, but it can also harm your feet because it impedes your circulation and slows healing if you injure your feet, ankles, or other lower extremity.

9: Avoid going barefoot. When your feet are exposed, you have a much greater chance of stepping on a sharp object or banging into something that could cause an injury to your foot. Bare feet are also vulnerable to fungal infections, which are spread through direct contact.

8: Wash your feet every day. This simple act can prevent infections and reduce foot odor.

7: Eat healthy. Choosing a well balanced diet can help you get to and/or maintain an appropriate weight. Being overweight increases the risk and severity of several foot problems. Your food choices can also affect joint pain and other inflammatory conditions. Talk to our foot doctor about foods that trigger or decrease inflammation.

6: Exercise regularly. This goes hand in hand with a healthy diet. In addition to helping with weight control, however, exercise also improves circulation and keeps muscles and tendons in the foot flexible and healthy.

5: Alternate your shoes. Allow shoes to air out between wearings. This will lower your risk of fungal infection and reduce foot odor.

4: No Bathroom Surgery. Don’t attempt to cut out warts, or fix ingrown toenails, blisters, calluses and corns. Leave these treatments to the professionals: our podiatrists, Dr. Varun Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah. The foot care specialists will take care of even minor foot problems with less pain and without the risk of infection incurred by “do it yourself” care.

3: Inspect feet regularly. Report any changes in color, shape, or temperature of your feet, as well as growths, redness, swelling, bruising or wounds that seem slow to heal.

2: Buy high quality, properly fitting shoes. This will go a long way in preventing many chronic ankle and foot disorders.

1: Don’t put off seeking medical care for foot pain. Delaying treatment often leads to worsening pain and disability. If you are experiencing any pain or discomfort in your toes, feet or ankles contact our Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction office in New Jersey by calling: 732-662-3050 today.

By Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care
March 17, 2017

As the thermometer begins to creep up into the 60’s and fields begin to thaw your children’s minds may be turning to spring sports. At Affiliated Foot & Ankle Care we applaud children being active but at the same time want to see them make the transition from winter activities (or inactivity) to spring sports without injuring their feet.

Caution: Potential Injuries Ahead

If your child has been participating in a winter sport, chances are the spring will bring workouts on very different types of surfaces. If, on the other hand, your child has spent the cold months indoors in front of a screen they will most likely be out of shape. In either case, the solution is the same. Start conditioning slowly and gradually increase practice and playing time. There are many injuries associated with overuse or increasing activity too quickly. Conditions such as Achilles tendon rupture or tendonitis, stress fractures and shin splints can be avoided if young athletes take time to stretch properly before and after exercise and if they follow a sensible program that doesn’t go from “0 to 60” in the first couple of weeks.

Pre-Sport Checklist

Before starting a spring sport, there are a few steps to take to insure a safe season:

  • Make an appointment for a pre-season podiatric check up. Our podiatrists, , Dr. Varun Gujral and Dr. Nrupa Shah will examine your child’s feet to make sure there are no existing injuries or conditions. The foot doctor can also make recommendations about types of shoes that will be most comfortable based on whether your child has a tendency to overpronate or has any foot or toe deformities. The podiatrist may want to take a look at your child’s current sports shoes to evaluate the wear pattern for clues to biomechanical issues.
  • Do a shoe inventory. Chances are if it’s been a year since your child played a spring sport they will need new shoes. Even for teens whose size may be stable it’s important to inspect sports shoes for wear. If new shoes are needed, get your child fitted at a professional sports shoe store.
  • Have a pain agreement. Be clear with your child that his or her foot health is more important to you than winning the game. Insist that they tell you if they are in pain and watch for signs in their technique and play that something is hurting.

If you have additional concerns about your child’s feet and sports activities, contact our Edison, Monroe or Monmouth Junction office by calling: 732-662-3050.