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What is a Podiatrist?

When to Call A Doctor
 


Foot Problems

General Statistics


Achilles Problems

Achilles Tendonitis | Peroneal Tendon Dislocation| Xanthomas of the Achilles Tendon


Ankle Problems

Ankle Sprain | Chronic Lateral Ankle Pain | Osteochondritis


Arch and Ball Problems

Flat Feet | Metatarsalgia | Plantar Fibromas | Sesamoiditis


Common Foot Injuries

Ankle Sprain Injuries | Broken Ankle | Fractures | Osteochondritis | Osteochondromas | Shin Splints | Sports Injuries


Deformities

Amniotic Band Syndrome | Bunions | Claw Toe | Clubfoot | DysplasiaFlat Feet | Gordon Syndrome | Haglunds Deformity | Hallux Limitus | Hallux Rigidus | Hallux Varus | Hammertoes | Jackson Weiss Syndrome | Mallet Toes | Metatarsalgia | Osteomyelitis | Overlapping or Underlapping Toes | Peroneal Tendon Dislocation | Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction | Sesamoiditis | Spurs | Tarsal Coalition


Diabetes and Your Feet

 

Diseases of the Foot

Arthritis | Cancer | Charcot Foot | Freiberg's Disease | Gout | Kaposi's Sarcoma | Kohler's Disease | Maffucci's Syndrome | Ollier's Disease | Raynaud's Disease | Severs Disease


Fungus Problems

Common Fungal Problems | Athletes Foot | Fungal Nails | Other Tips | Prevention


Heel Problems

Haglunds Deformity | Heel Callus | Heel Fissures | Plantar Fasciitis


Nail Problems

Black Toenails | Ingrown Toenails | Nail Fungus


Skin Problems

Allergies | Athletes Foot | Blisters | Burning Feet | Calluses | Corns | Cysts | Frostbite | Fungus | Gangrene | Lesions | Psoriasis | Smelly Feet and Foot Odor | Swelling | Ulcers | Warts


Toe Problems

Bunions | Claw Toe | Digital Deformity | Hallux Limitus | Hallux Rigidis | Hallux Varus | Hammertoes | Intoeing | Overlapping or Underlapping Toes | Subungal Exotosis | Turf Toe


Vascular/Nerve Problems

Acrocyanosis | Alcoholic Neuropathy | Chilblains (Cold Feet) | Erythromelalgia | Ischemic Foot | Neuroma | Spasms | Venous Stasis

Overview of Feet and Ankle Problems

Basic Foot Care Guidelines

 

Medical Care

Diagnostic Procedures

Computed Tomography | MRI | Ultrasound | X-Rays


Orthotics



Pain Management

General Information and Tips | Pain Management for Specific Conditions


Surgical Procedures

General Information | Achilles Surgery | Ankle Surgery | Arthritis Surgery | Arthroscopy | Bunion Surgery | Cyst Removal | Flatfoot CorrectionHeel Surgery | Metatarsal Surgery | Nerve Surgery | Toe Surgery


Therapies

Athlete's Foot Treatment | Cryotherapy | Extracorporeal Shock Wave | Fungal Nail Treatment | Physical Therapy | Iontophoresis | Neurolysis


Fitness and Your Feet

Exercise Those Toes | Aerobics | Fitness and Your Feet | Stretching | Walking and Your Feet | Jogging and Running


Sports and Your Feet

Baseball | Basketball | Cycling | Golf | Jogging and Running | Tennis


Foot Care

Basic Foot Care Guidelines | Athletic Foot Care | Blisters | Childrens Feet | Corns and Calluses | Diabetic Foot Care | Foot Care for Seniors | Foot Self Exam | Pedicures | Your Feet at Work | Bunion Prevention | Burning Feet | Ingrown Nails | Nutrition For Your Feet


Women's Feet

High Heels | Stockings? | Pregnancy | Women Over 65


Foot Odor and Smelly Feet

Prevention | Treating Foot Odor


Shoes

Facts About Shoes | Anatomy of a Shoe | Athletic Shoe Guidelines | Children's Shoes | Corrective and Prescription Shoes | What to Look ForMen's Shoes | Women's Shoes | Your Footprint | Wear Patterns


Links

Our Community Partners | Associations/Groups | GovernmentOnline Resources | Our Partners in Foot & Ankle Health

 

Adult-acquired flatfoot or posterior tibial tendon dysfunction usually leads to a gradual loss of the arch. The posterior tibial muscle is a deep muscle in the back of the calf and has a long tendon that extends from above the ankle and attaches into several sites around the arch of the foot. The muscle acts like a stirrup on the inside of the foot to help support the arch. The posterior tibial muscle stabilizes the arch and creates a rigid platform for walking and running. If the posterior tibial tendon becomes damaged or tears, the arch loses its stability and as a result, collapses, causing a flatfoot.

Surgery is often performed to give the patient a more functional and stable foot. Several procedures may be required to correct a flatfoot deformity, depending on the severity of the problem. These may include:

  • Tenosynovectomy—a procedure to clean away (debridement) and remove any of the inflamed tissue around the tendon.
  • Osteotomy—removal of a portion of the heel bone (calcaneus) to move the foot structure back into alignment.
  • Tendon Transfer—in which replacement fibers from another tendon are inserted to help repair damage.
  • Lateral Column Lengthening—A procedure that implants a small piece of bone, usually removed from the hip, outside of the heel bone to create the proper bone alignment and rebuild the arch.
  • Arthrodesis—Fusing of one or more bones together to eliminate any joint movement, which stabilizes the foot and prevents any further deterioration or damage.